Shall we play with words? (Blog Title Explanation)

The course blog title “Shall we play with words?” is a cultural allusion to the 1983 film War Games. After watching a clip from the movie, I would imagine that this title signifies how playing with words is like playing these games; it starts off simple enough: words after words with various punctuation in between to form complete sentences. As someone continues to write, the process becomes more intense; at times, writing itself can spiral out of control in that some words and ideas that shouldn’t be in the piece of writing find their way there. Only until after the writer stops working on the piece does this game between the mind and the writer stop.

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9 thoughts on “Shall we play with words? (Blog Title Explanation)

  1. I agree that writing does become more intense. How does writing start to spiral out of control? When do we start to lose control? Does the game between the writer and the mind actually stop? Wouldn’t it keep going because you think about the writing after you’ve finished reading or writing it.

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  2. Do you think that even after the writer physically stops working that the game still goes on? Does the writer just completely drop their thought processes after writing something? I’d like to think more often than not, a writer tends to think on what they just wrote for a long time after they’ve physically stopped the writing process. Or at least I do anyway.

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  3. As a side note, I’d like to mention how this reaction seems to be influenced by your reading (and writing about) of Billy Collins’ “Winter Syntax.” (Recall the prompt: A sentence starts out like …) I’m not suggesting that it replicates or is derivative of this poem, but rather that its logic approximates Collins’ own.

    Now, I know it’s true that writing spirals out of control — it just happened to me above after all — I read something, and I want to find a way in. This happened to me right now, reading this.

    I think you are playing with words.

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